Author Archives: Ashley Rose Kelly

Ashley Rose Kelly earned her Ph.D. at NC State and will join Purdue's Brian Lamb School of Communication in August 2014 as an Assistant Professor. Kelly's research focuses on rhetorical theory, genre theory, and science studies and has been published in Communication Monographs, Environmental Communication, and several other communication-related venues. As well, she writes for the PLOS Citizen Sci blog, Scistarter, and Discover's Citizen Sci Salon. She has taught courses in scientific and technical communication as well as in science, technology, and society (STS).

Rhetorical Studies of Science and Technology

The following discussion was co-authored with Elizabeth Pitts, a PhD student in Communication, Rhetoric and Digital Media program and NSF IGERT Fellow in Genetic Engineering & Society at North Carolina State University. --- An ethos of expertise—that is, an ethos grounded not in moral values or goodwill, or even in practical judgment, but rather in a narrow technical knowledge—addresses its audience only in terms of what it knows or does not know. The diminution of arete and eunoia in an ethos of expertise has a specifically rhetorical effect, because these qualities are relational in a way that expertise is not; similarly, the transformation of phronesis to episteme diminishes the practical, or relational, dimensions of knowledge. Without arete and eunoia, there is no basis for agreement on values or for belief in the good intentions of a rhetorical agent; the rhetorical relationship becomes impersonal. … The impersonality of an ethos of expertise runs (more...)