Tag: governance

The Technocratic Antarctic: Jessica O’Reilly on Science, Dwelling, and Governance

Editors note: this week, we're pleased to bring you a conversation between Stefan Helmreich and Jessica O’Reilly about her new book, The Technocratic Antarctic: An Ethnography of Scientific Expertise and Environmental Governance, just published by Cornell University Press.    Stefan Helmreich: Why Antarctica? Jessica O'Reilly: I came across the 1980's environmentalist movement to make Antarctica a World Park when I was putting together a campfire talk, while I was a park ranger in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park. That fall, I began grad school and began reading Bruno Latour. At the beginning of We Have Never Been Modern, Latour writes about an imaginary ethnography of the ozone hole—this is one of his examples of the hybridity of nature and culture. This idea seemed so weird and wonderful. Once I began reading about and talking to people who live and work in Antarctica, I learned there was this fascinating blend of speculative adventuring and (more...)

Country in the Cloud

We are accustomed to think of the "cloud" as a place-less, formless mass of data floating "out there." It has even been argued that new computer technologies and the movement of companies' data "to the cloud" might so transform our inherited notions of time, space, and power that it could mean the end of history, geography, and power.[1] The case of "e-Estonia," however, challenges this notion: Estonia is a country which, unlike people and companies going "to the cloud,” hopes to actually move itself "into the cloud," with profound implications for how we understand both the cloud metaphor and geopolitics in the digital age. e-Estonia Estonia is a small former Soviet Republic in northern Europe, with a territory of only 45 thousand square kilometers and population of just 1.3 million. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, it has made a number of moves towards building a digital state, or, as it is often referred to, (more...)

Knowledge Transfer, Transparency, IT: An Infrastructure Report from Co-Chairland

"Does CASTAC still serve a purpose?" "Should it continue?" This was the discussion at the first CASTAC meeting I attended at the 2006 AAAs in San Jose. It was like coming upon a cadre of fascinating people who share your intellectual proclivities only to hear tell of how this had been a most excellent and renown party—a veritable Cambrian explosion of Anthro-STS—but that was back before you got here, and there was beer. (more…)